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with egypt and with israel. they want an end to targeted assassinations, an end to israeli military operations within gaza. whether these -- and i spoke with one official from hamas today who told me that, you know, there are contacts with egypt, they are passing messages back and forth, but at this point he says he sees no imminent cease-fire popping up anytime soon. obviously the palestinians, hamas, and fatah as well will pay proper deference to ban ki-moon and any other official who wants to discuss this situation here, but really fundamentally the problem is between gaza and israel, and all those who come and try to help, if they're just coming to visit, express sympathy as some are doing, that's not going to change the situation on the ground. >> as you just said, 800 wounded. how are the civilians overall holding up there? >> reporter: well, to a certain extent they're accustomed to this. gaza in one form or another has been a place where there's been fighting, clashes, protests, occupation going back decades. so people are accustomed to life taking some very unexpected and v
now. egypt is the main broker. egypt is also in contact with the united states. also, there is turkey's involvement, qatar's involvement, the head of the hamas political wing is also involved. in temz of creating with israel, egypt is the main broker. we understand it has not been confirmed for us that an israeli envoy is at the table or at least has been and is involved in these talks, but the impression we're getting from the israeli side is that they're obviously involved in the negotiations and each side is looking very closely at what the other is proposing. has each side sent enough of a message that they can say, okay, this is it. we've sent our message. we want this and that, and now is the time to get off the military ramp? we'll see. >> you've covered this. when you take a look at this situation on the ground and you realize the israeli government is calling up 75,000 reservists, massing tens of thousands of troops and tanks near the border at the palestinian territory, what does this say to you in terms of a ground invasion? does it seem inevitable? what do you make of what
. the launch pad for peace may be in cairo. in the last 24 hours egypt has been mediating high-stakes discussions between israeli and hamas leaders. speaking today egyptian prime minister hish m kandil said -- in gaza, palestinian medical officials report 95 people have been killed in gaza including 23 children. for the second straight day, israel bombed a building housing local and international media. the target of the attack was a commanding member of an islamic jihad group who also had an apartment in the building. meanwhile, hamas continues to send rockets deep into israel. last night, israel's iron dome intercepted two rockets headed for tel aviv. yesterday, israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu had tough talks on twitter writing we are exacting a heavy price from hamas and the terrorist organizations. the idf is prepared for a significant expansion of its operation. in a press gaggle on route to cambodia this morning, deputy national security adviser ben rhodes says the white house's goal is to have nations with influence in the region speak for deescalation. speakin
. egypt's president is a leader of the muslim brotherhood. the assassination will be seen as a calculated and dangerous insult. egypt strongly condemns what israel is doing in gaza. this is an unacceptable act, and we deeply condemn it. >> what has changed since the war? the west and israel have lost their most reliable friend, and egypt's president mubarak. they saw him as an indispensable part of the solution at times like this. >> heightened tensions in the middle east tonight. in other news from around the world, the united nations secretary general ban ki moon has set a report on the failure to attack civilians. -- has said a report on the failure to attack civilians will have a profound impact. in iraq, simultaneous car bomb attacks across the country have killed at least 17 people. dozens were injured. the attack struck baghdad and other cities. it is not clear if the attacks are the work of one group. across europe, tens ofhousands have taken to the streets in protest of rising unemployment and government austerity measures. workers in spain, portugal, greece, and italy went out o
center stage in protests in egypt. the president seizes more power, undermining the country's democratic reform. the turmoil follows a still fragile cease-fire in gaza as the middle east takes another volatile turn. >>> at home, white house critics press for more answers about what went wrong in libya, and whether officials were truthful with the public. >> i relied solely and squarely on the information provided to me by the intelligence community. i made clear that the information was preliminary. >>> my guests this morning weigh in. chairman of the armed services committee carl levin. and chairman of the house homeland security committee, new york republican peter king. then where does america stand on the verge of a second obama term in office? the economy, the fiscal cliff talks, the president's priorities in the next four years. our roundtable is here. david brooks of "the new york times." msnbc's reverend al sharpton. former ceo of hewlett-packard carly fiorina >> historian and film maker ken burns. and nbc chief foreign affairs correspondent andrea mitchell. and we'l
. more clashes in egypt over the weekend as police use tear gas this morning to disburse protesters in cairo. i want to start there. we have "new york times" columnist david brooks and our own andrea mitchell. andrea, this is because president morsi has seized power, a day after brokering a cease-fire between israel and hamas, he is now consolidating power. how worry side the administration about it? >> very worried, but they are very, very cautious because he is their new point of leverage really with hamas. he is the future, they thought, of trying to negotiate something and revive the israeli-palestinian talks. and now suddenly he seizes power. he was looking for this opportunity. he is threatened by the judiciary and the other mubarak forces who have, he believes, stopped the constitutional process and stymied that. but for him to do this now, at his point of greatest authority, puts the administration in a bind. and it's unclear how this is going to resolve. >> david brooks, there's a larger strategic question. there's egypt, gaza, syria, iran. there's a president's second term
invasion as a very credible threat and that is done a lot to get the united states and egypt involved in the negotiations. the media work continues. the israelis have dropped leaflets over the gaza strip saying they are coming and prepared to invade and telling people to move to certain areas. at the same time hamaz is sending out text messages to israeli cell phones, specifically to the ones they think are linked to the army saying we will make gaza your graveyard. the tea leaves will finally be able to be read whenever hour for the cease-fire comes or we either have one or very shortly there after that ground offensive could start back to you. jenna: leland thank you so much. we'll talk a little bit about trouble we had at the u.s. embassy in tel-aviv today where a israeli man wielding a knife and an action attacked a security guard. they say the guard fired into the air and was only slightly injured. the suspect is now in custody. there are reports he had some mental health problems. police say political motives are not suspected at this time. jon: as we told you at the top of the
, hezbollah fired nearly 4,000 rockets in israel and claimed an upgrading of arsenal since. and now to egypt and the situation we've been keeping an eye on there. at this hour, the u.n. state department with a new warning for americans inside he egypt and our embassy in cairo vazing them to avoid large clouds there and the embassy reporting protesters are pelting nearby police guarding with molotov cocktails and all of this is a backlash against morsi escalating reports tonight of one person killed and another injured on attacks on muslim brotherhood north of cairo and the muslim brotherhood morsi's political party and angered many opposition activist was a power grab, and giving himself near absolute control of egypt. steve harrigan is streaming live for us from cairo. he understands you're in tahrir square? >> reporter: harris, that square behind me, as you can see from our live pictures, more tents have sprung up as the evening has gone on and those protesters say they are there to say we're hearing some small explosions and tear gas after three nights of protests here, skirmishes, and at
this aggression. egypt. egypt, the revolution, will not spare any effort to stop this aggression. and achieve a sustainable truce. >> meanwhile in washington, we're joined by two guests, the award winning palestinian journalist mohammed omer, and we want to teach you for being with us, back again, thank you so much. tell us what is happening on the ground in gaza right now. >> you are welcome. let me start with -- i'm in the southern part of the gaza strip s just launched two missiles, killing one person and a person has just arrived to the hospital. he was 24 years old. that brings the number of air strikes last three days to 502. this resulted in the killing of a 23 -- killing of 23 people, most of whom more civilians. we need to talk about the humanitarian situation in the gaza strip. this is a situation targeting a population of civilians, israel is shooting in a fishbowl. there is no shelter and nowhere to run for the general population. because that is living in a very dire situation. the u.n. has decided to shut all of these schools tomorrow as well as the ministry of education, higher
a deal before that happens will not work. the key to this -- egypt 40 years ago signed a peace treaty for israel. for 40 years they have not shot at each other. this is a different egypt now. it will all be about egypt. egypt has a really tight line to walk. if it somehow joins with the muscle burn brotherhood, america will cut them of their aid. i think egypt tries to walk right down the middle. i do not think they get involved dagen: do so with the president and prime minister was saying her in the last week. >> yes. the egyptian president worries that the way he came to power was they got rid of the last dictator. if he does not look sympathetic to the islamic cause and into israel, they will say who needs you. connell: as always, k.t. mcfarland, thank you for coming on. >> thank you. connell: we have some breaking news before we move on. the justice department has filed a lawsuit against ebay. they are saying that the agreement illuminated a significant former competition for the employees. watch ebay today. at the moment, the stock is up $0.56. the state of california had a simil
away and bring you up to speed with the headlines. egypt's president standing hard on his decree saying hey, it's only temporary. it didn't go over well. they demand that morsi lifts his rule. even larger demonstrations are planned for tomorrow. at least 117 people are dead after a massive fire at a clothing factory in bangladesh. it happened just outside the capital city of daka. you can see that every window is lit with flames. some workers did try to escape by jumping out those windows. 200 people were injured. officials say there were 200 workers mostly women, in the factory. they expect the death toll to rise. >>> china has successfully landed a fighter jet on an aircraft carrier for the very first time. china's official news agency says the aircraft carrier was originally being built for the old soviet union. it's expected to hold 30 j-15 fighter jets. it could be years before that carrier is fully operational. >>> and a six-alarm fire kept firefighters busy overnight. it continued until the early morning hours. two firefighters were hurt when a wall collapsed on them. 20 apartmen
strategic question. there's egypt, gaza, syria, iran. there's a president's second term that's got to be dominated by this region. >> i think so. it's the middle east, so there's good news and bad news. the good news is that the obama administration did an excellent job of supporting israel all through this. made israel feel moderate and the arabs feel realistic. the second piece of good news is that egypt, even under the muslim brotherhood, has an interest in having stability. that's very important. the bad news is the islamists are in control. in the palestinian areas with hamas and certainly in control in egypt. and there's going to be no peace as long as they are there in control, and u.s. policy has got to be a long, gradual process of trying to build up the non-islamists in the arab world, including in iran, across the region. >> that frames it. we'll hear more from you in the roundtable. >>> now let me turn to carl levin, chairman of course of the armed services committee in the senate. senator, to egypt. how concerned are you? is morsi a partner of the united states, or a p
to be with you. i'm terrell brown. we begin in egypt. president mohamed morsi is scheduled to meet with senior judges today to discuss his move to assume absolute authority. morsi's power grab has triggered three days of violent protests, injuring hundreds. yesterday the egyptian stock market was down more than 9.5%. some u.s. lawmakers are urging caution in dealing with egypt's new islamic leader. >> we don't obviously want to see a democratically elected autocrat take the place of an undemocratically elected dictator. which was the case before that. >> holly williams is in cairo this morning. what's the latest there now? >> reporter: good morning, terrell. here in egypt we saw a lot more violence yesterday. in cairo, protesters who were angry with president morsi fought running street battles with the police. protesters throwing rocks, police firing back with tear gas. one person was killed when a crowd attacked the headquarters of the muslim brotherhood, the islamist group from which the president draws much of his support. beyond the violence you get the sense the president's opponents don
in the days ahead. president obama also spoke last night with egypt president mohamed morsi about working together to preserve peace and security in the region. tension between israel and egypt's new islamist government has increased since the attacks with egypt recalling its ambassador to israel in protest. richard haass, also an emergency meeting of the u.n. security council last night. sift through this for us. how big is this? how significant is this in the middle east right now? >> well, it's big for lots of reasons, because it's not happening in isolation. one is you have the largest military clashes between israel and hamas in, what, four year now, and it's not going to stop. at times it doesn't matter in the middle east exactly why things begin. over the last few months there have been hundreds of rocket attacks, now this, then retaliation. it just happens. second of all, it's happening in the absence of anything political. there's no dialogue going on whatsoever between israelis and palestinians. this can't substitute for this. thirdly, egyptians withdrew their ambassador. since
israelis across the border. egypt warns the situation could escalate out of control. hello and welcome to gmt. it is 7:00 in the morning in new york and 8:00 in the evening here in beijing, where xi jinping has finally been confirmed as the country's next president. he will face a test like no other chinese leader before, having to preside over a party with major changes unleashed by market reforms. he says the party has to be more in touch with the people. >> after a mysterious, a secretive process, china has chosen its new leaders. the new party general secretary as expected, xi jinping. in front of the invited journalists, he wasted no time warning of the challenges ahead. >> the problems among our party members of corruption, taking bribes, being out of touch with the people, undue emphasis upon bureaucracy. >> little is known about xi jinping's preferred solutions to those challenges. seemingly different from his predecessors. he is also known to have close ties to the hardline military chief. chinese people have had no say in choosing their leaders begging the party has done that
're in "the situation room." >>> tensions heading toward a tipping point in egypt where thousands of mourners today marched through cairo's tahrir square for the funeral of a man killed in protest against the president. mohamed morsi is accused of a massive power grab, slashing the authority of judges, barring courts from overturning his rulings. the secretary of state hillary clinton today told her egyptian counterpart that the united states does not want to see power concentrated in one set of hands. even as president morsi meets with egypt's highest judicial body which has blasted his actions. let's go live to cnn's reza sayah in cairo watching what's going on. lots of people in tahrir square. we have live pictures of that as well. i understand that morsi actually met today with some of these top judges? >> reporter: he did, wolf. a lot of people eager to see how president morsi responds to this political crisis if he would back down under mounting pressure, if he'd make some concessions. it seems forn now the answer is no. many viewed one of his decrees as essentially disabling the judici
in the middle east. riots breaking out in egypt after president morsi effectively declares himself a dictator. welcome to "america live", everyone. hope you had a nice thanksgiving. now back to the news. i'm megyn kelly. that press briefing, the very first before after the thanksgiving holidays. there is a lot to talk about. the middle east will be a hot topic. this is what it looked like over in cairo over the weekend while you were with your family probably not paying too much attention to the news. but, boy, things are unfolding there in a major way with thousands of angry demonstrators calling president morsi, the new pharaoh and raising questions about our relationship with what was once a critical ally in the region. steve harrigan streaming live from cairo where we've been watching the crowds get bigger and bigger in tahrir square. steve? >> reporter: megyn, it looks like president morsi is trying to give the appearance trying to find a way out of the situation, some sort of compromise from the firestorm he set off four days ago with a order basically says any decrease he issues are po
that the spring is beneficial, we see that in egypt, this is not necessarily the case. the muslim brotherhood in egypt, the sunni islam that party with different views of regional policy. the egyptian president was in tehran recently for the non-aligned movement meeting and there is a lot of worry at him going to tehran would indicate that iran was isolated as the u.s. had imagined it to be or wanted it to be. more see meeting with iran officials indicated iran is an important regional player. of course what did morrissey during undreamed due? he criticized the regime of bashar al-assad and implicitly criticized the regime for his support of syria. this was an embarrassment for the iranian leadership, to the point that they change translation on television. he criticized syria and every man television set by rain. so trying to save face basically. but we've seen that egypt is not necessarily going to follow iran's policies in the region. in fact, the egyptians have kept their distance from tehran. they have not resumed relations in this a lot of tension in some issues. in addition, turkey eme
to "early start." today a very important day in the middle east. particularly in egypt. delegations from both israel and hamas are in cairo to meet separately with representatives from egypt to advance the cease-fire talks. and, as we mentioned this is all happening as israel's defense minister ehud barak announced he is resigning his post. that's just happening. meanwhile egypt internally embroiled by president mohamed morsi's move late last week granting really extraordinary powers. critics have called it an undemocratic power grab. today morsi meets with egypt's highest judicial body which has denounced his action. we're going to go now to matthew chance who is in london. good morning, matthew. i want to start with the news that really just happened. israel's defense minister ehud barak finishing up a press conference, announcing that he is resigning come january. any sense of whythis move is happening, and what next for ehud barak? he's really been a central key figure in israel for decades. >> yes, he certainly has. i don't think there's a great deal of surprise in this announcement
spring including the ongoing syrian civil war and the challenges facing egypt after its revolution. >> later today, singers and musicians roger daltrey and pete townsend of the who will be at the national press club to talk about the program they co-founded to help improve the lives of teenagers and young adults with cancer. they'll also discuss their plans for a new initiative called teen cancer america. it aims to set up hospitals and medical centers in the strategic areas across the country. see their remarks live beginning at 1 p.m. eastern over on c-span. >> you're watching c-span2 with politics and public atears. weak dies fee you are -- weekdays featuring live coverage of the senate and every weekend the latest nonfiction authors and books on booktv. you can see past programs and get our schedule at our web site, and you can join in the conversation on social media sites. >> former national security adviser stephen hadley was among the speakers at a recent conference focusing on national security challenges facing the united states. he said the top priority should be getting
pictures now. cairo, egypt, tahrir square. and thousands of people are refusing to go home. they are angry at their president. they say he's made himself a dictator. it's quiet now in cairo. it's just after 2:00 a.m., but it definitely was not quiet earlier in the day. listen. tear gas filled the air and crowds of protesters scattered when riot police tried to break up the protests in cairo. we have reports of demonstrators trying to break into the offices of the president's party, the muslim brotherhood. and at least one person reportedly died today in the street violence, a teenager. cnn's reza sayah spent much of the day right in the middle of the chaos in cairo. >> we keep seeing these clashes between protesters and police, protesters throwing rocks at police. police responding by firing tear gas and stun grenades. we're just a few blocks away from tahrir square. we should point out most of these protesters are young men, 20-something, teenagers, hard to say if they're here fighting for democracy or here to cause some trouble. those were chants of down with president mo
. >>> plus, the people of egypt trying to avoid trading one dictator for another. fighting back against a president who gave himself new powers. tonight a potential crisis point as the leader tries to put himself above the law. and how will the u.s. handle this? >>> plus, the chances of winning are ridiculously low. but millions of us are still lining up for a shot at a record powerball jackpot. >> lucky, lucky, lotto win. >> shepard: tonight a look at the actual odds of winning it all. but first from fox this tuesday night, three republican senators now say they cannot support the u.n. ambassador, susan rice, for secretary of state. at least until they get more answers about her comments about the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. president obama has not yet even nominated her. but the white house says she is enormously qualified. senators john mccain, lindsey graham and kelly ayotte say they're even more troubled now after meeting with ambassador rice. the attack on libya on september 11 killed the u.s. ambassador, cries stevens and three other americans. five days later, amba
, united states giving a bunch of money to egypt but did it take the money and run and turn its back on the united states? >> gretchen: there is a bomb shell. key evidence in the casey anthony trial may have been over looked whompt the heck was the prosecutor. and the bomb shell to convince the jury to convict her and didn't. >> brian: they didn't check firefox. [ mother ] you can't leave the table till you finish your vegetables. [ clock ticking ] [ male announcer ] there's a better way... v8 v-fusion. vegetable nutrition they need, fruit taste they love. could've had a v8. or...try kids boxes! this monday online only. get the droid razr by motorola in cranberry, free. or a white 7-inch samsung gaxy tab 2, just $99.99. this holiday, get the best deals on the best devices on the best network. exclusively at verizon. with thermacare heatwraps. thermacare works differently. it's the only wrap with patented heat cells that penetrate deep to relax, soothe, and unlock tight muscles. for up to 16 hours of relief, try thermacare. without freshly-made pasta. you could also cut corners by mak
minute. egypt's foreign minister alongside the secretary of state hillary clinton announcing a cease-fire between israel and gaza. ending a more than a week long conflict. he brokered a deal set to take effect at 8:00 p.m. israel time, 2:00 p.m. eastern. this resulted in a centur ceasee and resume calm. saying egypt is resuming its possibly of leadership that has long made it a cornerstone of regional stability. president obama: israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu earlier expressing his appreciation to seek a more advisable solution. especially in matters of weapons smuggling into gaza. i minister at yahoo express his appreciation for the support and assistance to the iran dome system. that is least for now, now i will take you back to melissa. melissa: thank you so much. it is expected to be a mad dash at stores all over tomorrow night. with some retailers open earlier than ever before. the tradition could be on its way out. our next guest says online shopping is lessen the significance of like friday deals. joining us is paypal shopping specialist. it does really feel like t
of israel and hamas are in egypt separately for peace talks. hamas issuing its demand for a cease-fire. they want israel to end a long-running military blockade of gaza immediately. the carnage from the last 24 hours, arwa damon is in gaza city. >> reporter: the large slab of concrete and mangled metal finally gives way. buried beneath it, another lifeless body. it's the second child we've seen. there was also a baby. others in the neighborhood say the blast killed all ten people who lived here. israel says it was targeting a man who heads a rocket launch unit. people we spoke with said they never heard of him. this was a family home. >> people here are telling us that so far those who have been killed in this strike have been women and children. and they have not been able to find any survivors. just moments ago, from that back corner, they did pull out the body of a tiny child. an over here there's another frantic effort under way. tempers easily flare as frustration and anger mount. >> she's my uncle's wife, this young man shouts. rage coupled with sorrow etched across his face
, china, south africa and egypt. >> i want a program that is more or less a mix of here and abroad. i did not want to do two consecutive years in germany, and i'm afraid i will never come back to egypt. >> the university wants students to go home when they graduate and contribute to their country's development. this didn't come from johannesburg to study water and engineering. she will be spending her second semester in berlin. >> i am looking forward to it. hopefully i come back in october. that should be really cool. i look forward to meeting new people in berlin in making new friends. >> many universities in germany can only dream of universities like these. it is the only institution of its kind in the world. >> we are traditionally an internationally oriented university, so it is a logical step to export our vision of education abroad. i think it will hugely boost our international reputation and the perception of our university abroad. >> the student dormitory is next to the campus. tuition is 5000 euros a semester. >> i miss my family, my mom, my dad, my sisters. but it is somethin
have come thick and fast. iran called the attacks organized terrorism. egypt's foreign minister called for a formal u.n. security council meeting to discuss the attacks. and said they must end. >> translator: egypt strongly condemns the israeli air strike in the gaza strip and the kellings of civilians and the assassination. we strongly condemn it. >> and wide gdemonstrations turned violent. in spain, riot police fired rubber bullets. and in lisbon, protesters tore down barricades lobbing rocks and bottles. workers also protested in greece, france and well engine against government policies that have driven up unemployment. the gdp is expected to sling by 0.2% in the third quarter pushing the bloc officially into recession territory. the eurozone downturn is taking its toll on germany. they had resilience tocrisis. economists are warning country could see a further contraction in the last three months of the year as dim prospects for the currency bloc continue to weigh on consumer and business sentiment. following this for us is still via ve still radio silva a vo [ silva a vod have a
. around our house, all are civilians. no one is firing. >> egypt has denied reports to be arranged a truce. >> for more on the high stakes of this escalating violence, i folk with former senator george mitchell. -- i spoke with former senator george mitchell. thank you very much for joining me. neither side appears to be backing down. this is not going to be over in a few days. just how serious is this? could we be seeing the start of the war? >> it is a very serious issue. i've been saying for some time, nearly a year, there was a will that had created a false sense of security on all sides. the real danger is not so much from the internal conflict within gaza, it is given the highly unstable and volatile situation in the region, this could be a spark that lights a conflict that extent in other unpredictable ways. it is a very serious matter. >> are you seeing any signs of that happening imminently? >> there is a long pattern in history. neither side appears to be backing down. that is in the case in the past. in the past, they have found in their mutual interest to establish a cease-fire
. appreciate it. [ sirens ] >>> new violence today in egypt. taking a look at this. protesters throwing rocks, police firing tear gas. fight for democracy intensifying there. cairo's tie rear square. grounds for protester. you hear the chanting. demonstrators are not leaving the square until president morsi withdraws the sweeping powers he granted himself last week. ressa sayah joining us live from cairo. it was billed as the opposition's biggest show of force yet. demonstrators converging, various points throughout the city. what do they hope to accomplish? what is the message? >> reporter: the message is they want to either oust president morsi or have him reverse his controversial decrees announced last thursday. this is an incredible site here behind us the tahrir squire, billed as 1 million man demonstration. not sure if there are 1 million people here, but certainly at lot of people. i'll zoom into tahrir square. the crowd is loud, energized, excited. tens of thousands of people here representing different factions in egypt. representing women's rights groups, western-style liberals, se
on the states because it's been a very fascinating story. egypt is still going through a revolution, halt asserted -- hasn't asserted itself, needs help from the rest of the world particularly economically. it can't be as assertive and play a role. iraq is not really fully integrated into the arab world left. what does that leave? syria is in trouble. that leaves the gulf cooperate council state led by saudi arabia. so what we have now is a coalition state, the gulf cooperation council around saudi arabia that invited two other states into the royal club, jordan and morocco, to broaden the gcc in exchange for economic and security cooperation going in different directions, and that is the coalition right now that is the powerful coalition in the arab world. and the states that are going through change are somewhat marginalized, there's no one else is so if you want to call that unity, go ahead. that's what we have. >> that's a problem. egypt will come back. >> it'll come back. >> and soon. >> and then in terms of identity politics, you get to a country like libya, you add the tribal -- >>
's go new to egypt where there's another political crisis brewing and some of it is taking place exactly where the arab spring started. got new video to share with you here of opponents demonstrating against president mohamed morsi's decision to broaden his power. it is the second day of protest. nbc's jim maceda is live for us in cairo. jim, good day to you there in cairo. what's going on this morning? >> hi there, alex. it's kind of a festive atmosphere down below me there on tahrir square. several hundred people chanting, marching, but the flag -- the tents are out. some of the stands are out. the tea man is out. it's a bit reminiscent of how it was almost now two years ago. and egyptians, you know, seem more divided than ever, alex. for many here their elected leaders -- or i should say the elected leader morsi himself has just driven a wedge deeper and even wider. at dawn there were more tents than protesters on tahrir square. ground zero for last year's uprising. but that didn't stop clashes with police on approach roads where protesters blocked traffic, defying president mohamed m
at the u.n. and in egypt to finally reach a truce here. we asked abc's christiane amanpour in jerusalem, where diplomatic efforts now stands. >> reporter: the gang of nine are meeting the prime minister and senior advisers and cabinet to try to figure out how to respond to a proposal put forward by egypt. so the effort is really under way to have a diplomatic solution. whether it works or not we are waiting to see. all the american efforts are going through egypt, when it comes to hamas. they're taking the lead. from what we understand, egypt wants to have a cease-fire, then a bigger negotiation about lifting the siege of gaza. hamas wants that all to be part of one agreement. and israel wants to see a stop of hostilities, no more rockets into israel and doesn't want to link that to a cease-fire. so those are the parameters. how they get close together to make a success of this is really what's under way right now. >> thank you, christiane am afternoon pour, reporting from jerusalem. the "l.a. times" did a great story on this, summed up the heart of the conflict here. and it says -- any
, president mubarak, out of leadership in egypt, there was -- they were assisting in creating instability around our other ally israel, and that instability continues to grow. one of the things that was helpful from egypt while president mubarak was in charge, at least there was some effort to restrict the transfer of rockets into the gaza strip. so there were some tunnels that would be found, the tunnels had to be kept small so they were able to get smaller rockets into gaza. but now that there's a new regime, apparently the bigger rockets are getting in to gaza and they pose more and more of a threat as they continue to be fired into israel. the action is not only the fall of an ally, president mubarak, but the assistance in bringing to power in egypt the muslim brotherhood. they want to see israel gone and they would also not mind seing the united states gone. it's important when formulating foreign policy that the united states, particularly the obama administration, decide, are we going to be assisted with our own personal security issue here in the united states by the actions we ta
is thrown together in egypt. we know they are an important relationship with us. what do we do? what does the united states do? >> we have to recognize our limitations. we can only play on the margins. money changes everything. morsy is achilles' heel, that is really the economy. tourism is gone. it is very important to them. foreign investment has essentially dried up. we do spend well over a billion dollars in aid, primarily to the military every year. it filters through the economy. we should stop -- connell: we should stop doing that? >> if morsy pushes through the constitution, there is no reason to continue sending over billions of dollars a year. it also looks like under this constitution that morsy bought off the army. they get the money. they spend it anyway they want. this constitution, as i understand it, there will be no interference by the army with the government. he has a good chance of becoming this software powered dictator. connell: thank you, sir. i appreciate you coming on. corporations paying out these early dividends. they are trying to be the coming tax hikes. our q
is testing is real. israel is testing egypt. there is more uncertainty about israel and the end of -- the relationship with iran. what is hezbollah doing now that they are involved in their own fights inside syria? the opportunity for turkey to play a role right now. it just is the normans. this is probably the least secure discussion there is. i am reminded of bob dylan's favorite song. i propose we adopted as the anthem. there must be some way out of here. let's aim of for some relief, and maybe a little less confusion. i would like to propose the following format for the beginning of the panel. then i want to open it up for a lot of questions on the floor. i would like to propose our panelists talked about the situation right now, especially in syria. but what if scenarios, and their recommendation and context and perspective on greater security in the region and what steps might be taken in syria in particular. the people we have on the panel today have their year on the ground. y are constituencies there ar people whose opinions are sought. i would like to introduce a membe
of clashes that erupted across egypt last week after president mohamed morsi issued a sweeping decree that significantly expands his own powers. let's go to cairo now where reza is following the story. what do we know about this attack? >> reporter: obviously, we've seen a lot of intense clashes over the past three days. we've reported hundreds of injuries. we hadn't seen a fatality until tonight. according to a spokesperson for the muslim brotherhood, the victim was a 15-year-old boy by the name of islam massoud. he's being described as a member of the muslim brotherhood youth group. this brotherhood official telling us he was killed when anti-morsi protesters tried to attack the offices of the muslim brotherhood in the northern city of damanhour. the protesters apparently were carrying clubs, knives, swords. the official said one of the protesters struck islam massoud in the head, he was rushed to the hospital, sadly he was pronounced dead. at this point it doesn't look like the muslim brotherhood is using this fatality to stir up supporters. we're going to have to wait and see what
, michael steele and jonathan capehart onset as well. rick stengel went to interview the president of egypt. obviously he's the man at the center of all the action in the middle east right now. we're all trying to figure out who he is. i learned something by reading "time" magazine. i found out he's a usc grad and still a trojans fan. little known fact. >> always start with the important parts of life. >> i'm sure he's very upset with what happened with the notre dame game. more importantly, who is this man who seems to be an accidental president who suddenly feels very comfortable with seizing power in the most important arab state in the planet? >> it's really interesting. this interview done by rick stengel and my colleagues is amazing because it sheds some light on this man who is really an ig enigma. he's walking var fine line between hard core islamists and others in the middle east. one of the most interesting things in the interview is how he feels about the u.s. that's been a big question mark for everyone here. what is this man's relationship to the u.s. what is our relationship w
news alert out of egypt where we're seeing new clashes between protesters and police at a massive opposition rally against president morsi there. escalating violence is spreading across the city and much of egypt really for the last five days ever since the president's controversial decree granting himself nearance sew lieutenant power. that is a move many critics say is veiled attempt to turn egypt back into dictatorship. others say morsi is attempting to clean out the old guard and reaffirm a brand new move to a new government in egypt. something we're watching closely in the middle east. with pressure growing last night, morsi sat down last night with a five-hour meeting with the country's senior judges in an attempt he says to diffuse the situation but refused calls to withdraw the decree. >>> there is new push on capitol hill to stop the environmental protection agency from moving forward with a plan to impose stricter oil and gas regulations which opponents say will only cause more pain at the pump and drive a gal ghoul lon of regular -- gallon of regular gasoline higher tha
-fire or a truce. they tried doing that a day ago using egypt as the intermediary, that fell through. now egypt has taken its ambassador out of israel, so who will do the mediation and who will try to get in between these two warring factions and try to get them to come together to stop this is going to be a real difficult, a real problem, i think, for the time being. but israel is saying, look, if you keep send rockets into our country, we are going to respond and we are going to respond with force. >> sara sidner inside gaza. >> wondering about that response inside the neighboring country. >>> coming up, how the president will pay personal attentions to the victims of sandy, just hours from now. [ boys screaming ] hi, i just switched jobs, and i want to roll over my old 401(k) into a fidelity ira. man: okay, no problem. it's easy to get started; i can help you with the paperwork. um...this green line just appeared on my floor. yeah, that's fidelity helping you reach your financial goals. could you hold on a second? it's your money. roll over your old 401(k) into a fidelity ira and take control of
became a symbol of the war in gaza when the visiting prime minister of egypt and the hamas prime minister touched the dead and i the child who was martyre. >> translator: the blood son both of our hands, ours and on the egyptian hands. >> reporter: we watched more children being brought into the hospital. the doctors say several have died, including a child burned to death. >> as a doctor, as a human, i am crying. i can't do anything for him because i know he's died now, you know. and you can't imagine if it's your baby how you feel. why? why? >> reporter: influx of casualties, men, women and children, is overwhelming this hospital underlying how this war is not just between soldiers. civilians on both sides of the border are enduring the grinding pain of loss. >>> that was sara sidner reporting. israeli civilians are also getting caught in the crossfire. our frederik pleitgen reports several rockets fired from gaza caused injuries in southern israel this morning. we'll take you live to that region next hour. >>> 400 bullets, two assault rifles and a ticket to "twilight." why police belie
, fearing it could draw egypt in to that consulate. and joining us the consulate general, good to see you ambassador. >> thank you for having me. >> dave: the latest what we just said. benjamin netanyahu told the cabinet he's ready to significantly be expand its operation in gaza. is israel prepared for a ground invasion into gaza and what could incite that? >> look the mandate from the inception was to remove this strategic threat posed by thousands of rockets on israelis-- innocent israelis paralyzing our entire southern region. so the goal was to remove that threat and the mandate given to the defense forces from the government was not limited in time nor in scope. so in other words, the possibility of israel moving in with ground forces certainly exists, it depends how the operation develops on the ground. right now, hamas is firing rockets. hamas is still displaying a tremendous degree of aggression towards israel and the purpose of this operation is to eliminate that threat. >> more than 1100 rockets have been launched from gaza into israel in this year alone. just this morning, i r
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